Different isn’t bad… it’s just different…

We are different and they way we’ve approached our finances (and our journey out of debt) have been different.  

We use cloth diapers instead of regular diapers to save money.   It’s not for everybody but it was an area I felt I could cut our costs and we did it.  Not bad just different.

We line dry clothes not every load (and on rainy days like today everything will go in the dryer) but enough that it was a significant amount of savings on our higher power bills.  Not bad just different. 

We haven’t taken several extra jobs to pay off the debt the way Dave Ramsey says we should.  I took a very part-time job that fell in my lap but beyond that we’ve not even considered extra jobs.  We decided with much prayer that our circumstances (hubby’s constantly changing schedule, farming and 2 little kids home full-time) made extra jobs far too difficult and too costly (costly in ways beyond money) for our family.  Not bad just different. 

On to another one of those areas where I have finally decided we aren’t bad just different.  I like Dave Ramsey.  I really enjoy his books and was so excited to finally get a great deal on the Financial Peace University Home Study Kit.   (The ever-changing schedule of hubby makes a normal class schedule impossible).  We started FPU at home last Wednesday.   Hubby does not share my excitement about FPU (or our finances for that matter) for the first 15 minutes he sat at the computer (contemplating a farm purchase) and looking up at the DVD from time to time.   After the first 15 minutes we finished the DVD together. 

After the class was over and I was talking about our homework it became clear that it was my homework, that I would need to do our quickie budget and he’d look over it when he needed too.  Dave Ramsey always talks about spouses sitting down and doing the budget together, discussing every penny.  FPU or not that won’t happen here and just because that doesn’t happen here doesn’t mean that we “have bigger problems” or that we are destined for money fights and financial ruin. 

I do the budget, determine savings and most of the time I decided what is doable where our goals are concerned.  Maybe to some that seems really bad.   Hubby and I are on the same page with our goals for our family.  We both want (and are willing to work hard) to be debt free by the end of the year (but I came up with the plan).  We both want to save as much money as possible for our home down payment (but I am the one that came up with the number).   On the other side of that, hubby does the farm budget and purchase planning without my input.  He gives me information when something big (purchase, sale & loss) happens or when I ask.  We take a small portion of profit from the farm (that we use for our down payment fund most of the time) so he’ll sometimes tell me when to expect a bit of a bonus.  Our personal stuff and our farm stuff are kept completely separate so he does one and I do the other. 

It works for us.  It’s not an indication that we are heading to financial failure or separation.  The only thing it indicates is that doing things a little different works for us.  It’s not bad that we don’t have budget meetings and rarely even discuss our budget at all, it’s just different.

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2 Responses to Different isn’t bad… it’s just different…

  1. David Godin says:

    What is Dave’s view on mortgages? I haven’t read his books but if I understand the snowball thing your mortgage will be the last thing you pay off correct? Are you including that in your percentage calculations? Just curious…
    Love the name of your blog and your decission to stay home and make it possible financially by getting out of debt. Keep it up and best of luck.

    • Dave doesn’t borrow but says that 15 year fixed mortages are ok provided they don’t use more than 25% of your income a month. He does put paying off the mortgage at the end of the baby steps after other consumer debt is paid off and 3-6 months living expenses are in the bank. We’ll be getting the mortgage after we pay off our consumer debt. Once we start building we’ll continue to work on building 3-6 months living expenses and then start attacking the mortgage.

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